Security Contractor Jobs Mexico

Security Contractor Jobs Mexico

– Providing armed static security on oil rigs in the Gulf of Mexico for a U.S. oil and gas company – Security expert working 12 hours 7 days a week for the duration of the rotation – Rotation: 2 weeks to 2 weeks off The report revealed that the United States awarded more than $170 million in anti-drug contracts to Mexico between 2005 and 2009. much of it comes from the nearly $2 billion in security assistance that Congress has provided through the Merida Initiative. On the one hand, the money available in Mexico is not the same as the money that flowed through the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, where the U.S. government has spent more than $200 billion on private entrepreneurs over the past decade. “The Mexican government will not allow American entrepreneurs to be armed in Mexico, and I can tell you that this alone will result in many companies, large and small, not even consider working there,” Braun said. Foreign entrepreneurs who work with Mexican companies to provide armed guards typically subject these workers to extensive background checks, according to Munks, but entrepreneurs are still exposed to significant risks. U.S. security aid funds some of these programs, while other contractors are paid by the Mexican government, whose security spending has grown from $1.7 billion in 2005 to more than $12 billion in 2011, according to the Mexico Evalua think tank. A growing number of U.S. military personnel, past and present, are also training Mexican security forces in counterinsurgency, electronic surveillance, and other techniques refined by lengthy U.S.

engagements in Iraq and Afghanistan. There are no exact figures on the number of U.S. security companies operating in Mexico, but the Pentagon and the State Department spent $635.8 million on drug deal deals in Latin America in 2009, a 32 percent increase from 2005, according to an analysis created by the Office of Senator Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) in June. Sweeney said he worked as a security contractor in Iraq until 2006. Today, its approximately 15 entrepreneurs are operating in Mexico. Most of them are former soldiers from Britain and Australia. No one is allowed to carry a gun, so they work with local Mexican companies that can provide firepower. Armed private security is a booming business in many parts of Latin America, and the demand for personal protection services in Mexico is growing by at least 20 percent a year, driven by foreign and local executives who want to protect their families and employees, according to Robert Munks, senior americas analyst at IHS-Jane`s. based in London, which follows global security trends. After years of lucrative work in the Middle East and Central Asia, where their presence has sometimes been compromised by incidents of excessive violence and misconduct, entrepreneurs and private security companies of various sizes and specializations are drawn into a conflict closer to home. But Mexico`s restrictive gun laws mean foreign entrepreneurs must enter the bloody war on unarmed drugs, as they take on jobs ranging from counseling and technical training for the Mexican military to protecting executives from kidnapping gangs and blackmailers. Then there is the issue of Article 27 of Mexico`s Arms Act, which is necessary for anyone who is tempted to make a transition from Kabul or Baghdad to Mexico`s urban wastelands.

It essentially bans foreigners from carrying firearms in Mexico — a disruptive factor for many potential fortune hunters, despite their growing interest in the country, said Michael Braun, former CHIEF operating officer of the DEA and now a partner at Spectre Group International LLC, a private security firm based in Alexandria. – Former military in a combat weapon or SOF MOS is a plus – Experience in Mexico working with local national security forces – Experience with FBOs, private aircraft, pilots and the ability to coordinate everything to support customer movements – Experience in Singapore, United Arab Emirates and Mexico – Completion of an advanced driving course / driving dynamics – Prior participation in a recognized executive protection course (i.e. ESI, EPI, Oatman, PFC, ITG4, TFTT) – Candidates under LEOSA HR-218 – In addition to English, candidates who also speak a certain level of Spanish will prefer Mexico to have some of the strictest gun control laws in the hemisphere, even if drug gangs amass massive arsenals of AK-47 assault rifles, grenade launchers and other military weapons. While foreigners who have their permanent residence in Mexico can obtain permits to possess certain firearms for hunting or defense of the homeland, Mexican law prohibits non-citizens from working as armed security guards or carrying hidden weapons for self-defense. – Must have a current STCW95 – DD-214 with honorable discharge – Active TWIC card – Must have a valid U.S. passport with a minimum of 12 months until expiration – Open only to U.S. Army veterans who have experience in providing armed protection security in amphibious/maritime environments – Must be physically fit and able to pass a fitness test – Must be able to run or sprint occasionally, lifting and/or moving up to 50 pounds on a regular basis and occasionally lifting and/or moving more than 100 pounds Yet the huge volume of trade between the United States and Mexico often forces U.S. leaders to cross the border. .

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